What I do when I ‘hit the wall’ in training

'Hitting the wall' is a feared term in endurance circles. But it can happen to a lesser extent in weight training as well. It's that point in training where you feel like you can't go on, where taking just one more step or lifting one more rep can seem impossible. Unless you're an elite athlete, it can happen to anyone, including me. So how do you cope?

Demotivated? How to deal with your fitness demons

It's 6pm: you've finished work for the day and are looking forward to hitting the gym. You've been working hard and the results are paying off. Yet, despite all this, the second you set foot outside, your motivation starts to wane. Sat at your desk- eyes glued to an Excel spreadsheet - the gym had seemed like a welcome break, but now, when the alternative is a warm house, the sofa and a slice of carrot cake, getting sweaty suddenly doesn't seem the best option. So, is there anything you can do to tackle your demotivating inner voice?

Weight lifting: The big questions answered

'What weights should I be lifting?', 'what is a drop set?', and 'should I be worried about DOMS?' Starting out on a programme of resistance training can be intimidating for both men and women, especially when faced with a barrage of jargon. What's more, the weights section of a gym can often feel unwelcoming, meaning many people avoid this important aspect of training. In an attempt to make all newcomers feel more confident, here are some answers to some frequently asked questions.

Why should I lift weights?

Dumbbells

'Lifting weights makes you bulky'. 'I'll look masculine if I do too much resistance training', 'cardio is the best way to slim down'. You've probably heard these excuses before, or may even have uttered them yourself - I certainly used to. It's a fairly common belief, but in the majority of cases, simply isn't true. In fact, it is one of the most pervasive myths surrounding resistance training.